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Trace of Dream

Date : 03 July - 27 July 2014
Location: People's Gallery P3, 2nd floor

by Bhanuwat Jittivuthikran
Opening reception: 6 July 2014 at 17.00 hrs.
“Trace of Dreams , a prayer for the forgotten land” is an intimate photographic  portraits of Tibetan diaspora, This is an exhibition  that seek to explore the spiritual linkage among Tibetan diaspora who live on remote refugee camp, situated on the eastern fringe of Himalaya, between China and India border. After being forcibly to exile in 1949, today many Tibetans diaspora still remain optimistic about a chance of return home.

Artist Statement 
When face obstacles in life, Tibetan take refuge in a prayer, a solemn request to a deity to protecting and dispel the miseries from their beloved. I want to explore the spiritual linkage within their devotion their tolerance and compassion, the energy that creates an everlasting bond between them. The multi-exposure technique allows me to explore an inward relationship among these people. I am interested in how the photographic medium can translate a particular time and space, memories and thoughts into something visible. When each image has begin merge together as I started recording each individual praying in different place and time, there is an visible intimacy among these people, a trace that yearn for sharing life with one another. Which is sustained by hope. Even there is no guarantee about the future.
 
Photographers’ Biography
Bhanuwat Jittivuthikarn was born in Bangkok in 1984. He graduated form School of Creative Art University of Melbourne in 2006 with a combine degree in International Politics.  He  hosted numerous solo exhibition in both Thailand and aboard In 2007, He joined SNF Sathirakoses-Nagapradipa Foundation, one of leading grassroots empowerment organization in Asia where he had cover numbers of photographic projects including “Diaspora Smile, Portraits of Tibetan in Exile” a photo essay on life of Tibetan refugee in India. “In search of lost Eden”, a photo essay on Sri Lanka  during process of reconciliation after the civil war. “ Requiem of Andaman”, photo essay on aftermath of Indian ocean Tsunami.  He was selected as part of young Asian photographer to join “Angkor photo workshop” where he was study under Magnum photographer, Antoine D’Agata. In  2006 he has won Young Thai Artist Award, in Photographic category .  In  2012 he won first prize “ Chang Fine Art Photo Contest’  In 2013 he won Honorary Gold Medal in Monochrome photography category  from Royal Photographic Society Thailand.
 
Extract from artist journal
In 2007, I had suffer from visual and hearing impairment. To find the way to escape from this deep pain in life, I decide to become a volunteer in  Tibetan refugee camp in India.  During this journey my life become slower but more delicate. I had become more mindfulness to other people life, something that I did not pay attention before. I learn to contemplate on the misery of other human being. I realize that when we can touch the painful feeling of other our pain in life also become lessen. I begin to accept that life is full of unfairness. But to cultivate compassion for other is a secret for our survival in this harsh world. I have found peace in my mind among those refugees who teach me that the people who have less materialize can be blissful in their life.  Somehow I feel that all our life is interrelated, we’re caught in an inescapable structure of destiny. Our lives is not our own. From birth to death, we are bound to share with others. Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly. 
 
Extract from personal prayer
“To All Sentient Beings on earth, may our way life not marred by any obstacles. May Dharma prevail on earth. May my country regain its freedom. May I return to my homland. May the sufferings of all sentient beings come to an end. My life has passed, it is neither good nor bad. Being in forgien land there is always a burden of what will happen next. I am not in my country and can’t expect a good life in a country where I don’t belong. I am old now so I will work towards my next lives by saying this prayers.”
 
Ngawang Dorjee, January 2012, Choephelling Tibetan settlement, Miao, Arunachal Pradesh, India.  
 
Extract from Exhibition Essay
American scholar Susan Sontag has said in her well-known text On Photography, related to the production of a new category of photography that was more concerned with the communicable rather than the representable. Bhanuwat’s photography falls directly in line with this perceptive observation and his subtle stress upon idea rather than item places fitting emphasis upon content rather than subject – in short, his photographs have something to felt  more than to be seen , to feel the silent of each prayer translate into vibrant energy. Their blurring face with dimly-outlined and unceasingly in motion which fleetingly seems as though it has no edges, no ending in time or space. it stretches a far as you can see and then disappear into the darkness. where there is a unity between the eye, mind, body and the entire work. To savor the feeling of “reverence” and somehow “dread” in the face of this limitlessness beauty.  
 
For more Information please contact
Cherdchalerm Rittiron 081 341 7101 email:  joe_jitti@hotmail.com

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